Dr. David Alexander Gold PhD, C.Psych
Assistant Professor
Brain and Therapeutics, Consultation/Liaison Psychiatry

Contact Info

T: (416) 603-5800 5780

Location

University Health Network
Krembil Neuroscience Centre
Toronto Western Hospital, Neuropsychology Clinic, 4F-409, 399 Bathurst St.
Toronto, ON, M5T 2S8

Appointment Status

Primary

Dr. Gold is a staff neuropsychologist at Toronto Western Hospital, and holds an Assistant Professor academic appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at University of Toronto. He primarily conducts neuropsychological assessments for the epilepsy program, but also consults to other UHN services such as Neurology. Dr. Gold also maintains a small private practice. His PhD investigated memory changes in daily life for those with early evidence of Alzheimer’s disease. During his residency at Duke University Medical Center, he gained specialized experience assessing and providing CBT treatment for ADHD before completing his clinical neuropsychology fellowship at Saint Louis University and his postdoctoral research fellowship at Washington University in St. Louis. He is a registered Psychologist with the College of Psychologists of Ontario with declared competency with adults and seniors in clinical psychology and neuropsychology.

Research/Teaching

Research Synopsis

Dr. Gold is interested in better understanding the impact of changes in cognition and exploring ways to improve quality of life in individuals with neurological compromise. These interests bridge assessment and intervention. He maintains interests in questions from his doctoral work measuring instrumental activities of daily living as we age or with neurological illness, as well as how to rehabilitate event cognition. He is also investigating the cognitive neuropsychology of memory and higher-order cognition in epilepsy populations before and after resective neurosurgery. The goal of this line of research is to develop more sensitive tools to characterize cognition and predict post-operative changes. He is also interested in adapting cognitive behavioral therapy interventions for populations with neurological illness.

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