Dr. Tarek Rajji
Professor
Geriatric Psychiatry
Tarek Rajji
Contact Info
T: (416) 535-8501 33661
Location
Centre for Addiction & Mental Health
80 Workman Way
6312
Toronto, ON, M6J 1H4
Appointment Status Primary

Dr. Rajji was appointed Chief in Geriatric Psychiatry at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in September 2012. Dr. Rajji is also a clinician scientist and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto.

Dr. Rajji obtained his M.D. from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. He completed residency in general psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and clinical training in geriatric psychiatry at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in Pittsburgh. In 2006, he joined CAMH and the University of Toronto as a research fellow in geriatric psychiatry and then as a clinician scientist and an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry in December 2009. He was promoted to Associate Professor in July 2013. Dr. Rajji is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with subspecialty in Geriatric Psychiatry.

Dr. Rajji was the lead geriatric psychiatrist on several clinical initiatives at CAMH prior to assuming the roles of Chief and Medical Head. He also received numerous research awards and honors. His research is supported by private, provincial, federal, national, and international agencies.

Dr. Rajji focuses on restoring brain function in older patients with severe mental illness and Alzheimer’s disease. Towards this goal, he combines brain stimulation, cognitive, functional, and pharmacological methods to study and enhance neuroplasticity across the lifespan with a special focus on late life.

Research/Teaching

Research Synopsis

Using brain stimulation, neurocognitive, and neurophysiological approaches, my research focuses on understanding the mechanisms that underlie the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia and on developing novel interventions to enhance cognition in schizophrenia across the lifespan.